A Spirituality of Video Editing

This post will be a work in progress, written over the next few days as I am creating a watchable movie out of about 7(?) hours of footage.

I am currently working on my 4th movie. All four of the movies I have made have been about the work of women religious aka nuns. This current project comes from my time in February spent with the women of the Poor Clare Monastery in Traveler’s Rest, South Carolina. Filmmaking is an art and a craft, which requires a challenging mix of creativity, technical know-how, interpersonal skills and patience . I have some of these in greater abundance than others. Anyhow, as I work to put together a watchable movie (I call it that because, as brilliant as each piece is, the raw 7 hours is just not watchable and needs to be crafted), I am thinking a lot about the spirituality of this process.

What I’m learning is that editing is the real step where the film’s making happens. Imagine I give you a stack of 100 magazines and ask you to make a collage. You’d select words and images to fit your page. Well, imagine I gave dozens of people the identical stack of 100 magazines. They’d come up with dozens of unique collages, wouldn’t they? So, the end product is the collage and each one looks different. Sure, the original images, fonts and colors were chosen by whoever put together the magazines in the first place but for this new creation, the collage, it is one of a kind. That’s the same with editing. In fact, I am going to start paying more attention to who is editing movies since it is their vision which is reflected in the final product. Director Martin Scorsese has worked with the same editor for 40 years-since she was 40. And, yes, I did say she. That’s pretty cool, huh? So, hats off to the editors out there. I see you and I know what you’re doing (often alone, often indoors, often without recognition). Keep at it.

Below is a quote by Frederick Wiseman who has made something like 40 different documentaries. Mamma mia! What productivity! What discipline! He has explained that his reason is to fight off the depression that comes when he finishes working on a movie. He delves right in to the next one. He edits his own movies. Here’s what he has to say that got be thinking about this art in terms of spirituality:

tr wiseman

The first part of this quote I like because it resonates with my own style. I do not go into a documentary with it all planned out. I don’t have some heavy duty agenda that drives every question I ask and every quote I choose to use. I sit and I talk and, boy oh boy am I fortunate to have sat in the presence of so many wonderful wise women at this point. I think I’ve interviewed about 50(?). They tell me stories from decades ago when they joined their communities or a few years ago at age 80, when they felt God calling them to go to Haiti. These stories are amazing and they come out because I listen and because they feel free to talk about whatever comes to mind.

The second part of his quote I like because he hits the nail on the head. The filming part is social, it is around people. It involves moving around, eating lunch with people, charging batteries, driving places and being a good guest in the space of others. The editing part is contemplative. I listen to the same hourlong interview 3 or 4 times, taking notes and really truly trying to listen to what they are saying. I’m the interviewer/director and the editor so speaking from that experience, I will still say that the editor is where the real movie-shaping comes in.

Yesterday, I sat down at my computer to squeeze in an hour of editing and look who I discovered outside the window, watching me edit my movie about FRANCISCAN nuns:tr screen

Next day:

I have just watched and listened very carefully to an hourlong interview with one of the sisters. I took some advice from a new friend and I listened to it, I mean really listened to it, rather than watching it as I determined which parts to keep.  It is not 100% finished yet, but for now, I am putting it away to open up another interview and begin the process again. I am working in segments or sequences. I work on one person’s interview at a time, doing all of the steps and really focusing on that one person until it is in the basic shape it will be in the final product. It is a good feeling to  put this one away for now and I like the ebb and flow of it. It is only about 2.5 minutes but in it, the speaker covers

-Description of someone who visits the monastery to talk about his prayer life

-The jobs she does within the community.

-A description of the retreat center they offer to visitors.

-Something which sums up her role there. I will use this in the closing montage where I have a line or two from each of the people interviewed.

Now, I am going to take a few minutes to pray about which interview to delve into next. I think lots of things can come into play-my mood, the time of day, etc. which will influence how I edit it so I need to make sure it is the right one.

 

 

 

Please stay tuned as I update this post as I reflect more on the Spirituality of Editing

 

 

 

 

 

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2 thoughts on “A Spirituality of Video Editing

  1. I love your reflections and the gift of brother/sister deer who seems to be watching you, vigiling with you!
    Blessings,
    Michelle

    Michelle L’Allier, osf
    Franciscan Sisters of Little Falls, Minnesota
    Franciscan Life Center/Companioning Ministry

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